Redskins All-Decade Team: Offense

In the past ten years, Redskins fans have endured countless hardships. While the Eagles, Giants and Cowboys have each won the division three times, Washington has claimed the title just twice. While teams such as the Patriots have only had two starting quarterbacks in the past fifteen years, Washington has had nine quarterbacks in the past ten years.

Since owner Dan Snyder bought the team in 1999, Washington football has been synonymous with failure, whether on the field, or off. Atrocious signings such as the 100$ million contract Albert Haynesworth signed in 2012, or Adam Archuleta’s 30$ contract in 2006. A lack of production in the NFL draft consistently hampered the production coming from Redskins’ rookies. Washington selected six players in the first round during 2005-2015, ranking 30th in the NFL. General manager Bruce Allen is infamous for his 2012 trade in which he dealt three first round picks in order to acquire quarterback Robert Griffin.

Though the Redskins have been a franchise full of failure for a long time, the Scot Mccloughan Era may have finally brought hope to the nation’s capital. After two strong drafts, and many modest free agent signings, Washington may be in position to repeat as division champs for the first time in over thirty years. 

QB: Kirk Cousins (2012-2016) 25 GS 65.2 CMP% 7196 yds 47-30 TD/INT 91.3 Rating

NFL: Washington Redskins at Philadelphia Eagles

Kirk Cousins leads the All-Decade team.  Credit: Jeffrey G. Pittenger-USA TODAY Sports

Surprisingly enough,  Captain Kirk has posted the best statistics out of all Redskins’ quarterbacks. He struggled early on in his career with accuracy, but posted the highest completion percentage in the NFL in 2015.

RB: Clinton Portis (2004-2010) 84 G 6824 YDS 4.1 YPA 81 YPG 46 TDS 1340 Rec YDs 1x Pro Bowl

The Broncos traded Portis to Washington in 2004 and the exuberant RB was the face of the franchise for the following six years. Alfred Morris had a better YPC over his four-year tenure with the Skins, but he did not challenge Portis in any other statistic.

    
FB: Mike Sellers (2004-2011) 120 G 46 GS 150 Rush YDS 821 Rec YDS 15 TDS

Sometimes overlooked due to his position, Mike Sellers was a consistent commodity for numerous different QBs and coaches over his eight years in DC.

WR: Santana Moss (2005-2014) 146 G  581 Rec 7867 YDs 47 TDs 1x Pro Bowl

       Pierre Garcon (2012-2015) 58 G  297 Rec 3500 Yards 18 TDs
       Antwaan Randle El (2006-2009) 63 G 186 Rec 2202 Yards 8 TDS

JacksonGarcon

Pierre Garcon makes the team, while Desean Jackson is left off

Santana Moss delivers the best statistics of all Redskins’ players over the past decade. He played in the most games, reeled in the most catches, and had twice the  yards of any other wide out in the organization. Garcon has been a red-zone target in his four years for the Skins, and makes an impact whenever he is on the field.

TE: Chris Cooley (2004-2012) 117 G 669 Rec 4711 YDS 66 TDs 2x Pro Bowl

A fan favorite, Chris Cooley leads all offensive skill position players in Pro Bowl appearances.

LT: Chris Samuels (2000-2009) 141 GS 76 AV 6x Pro Bowl 7.6 AV/Y

LG: Kory Lichtensteiger (2010-2015)  72 GS

C: Casey Rabach (2005-2010) 95 GS

RG: Randy Thomas (2003-2009) 82 GS 1 Pro Bowl Alternate

RT: Trent Williams (2010-2015)   83 GS  4x Pro Bowl 55 AV 9.2 AV/YWilliams1

The duo of Trent Williams and Chris Samuels would probably be the best pair of tackles in the NFL, as they combine for 10 total Pro Bowls. On the other hand, the interior offensive line could be the weak link to the teams offense.

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Best and Worst NFL Drafts

Just thirteen minutes before the NFL draft started last Thursday a photo of the top offensive tackle in the draft, Laremy Tunsil, smoking weed appeared on Twitter. This photo led him to slide down eight picks, before he was selected by the Miami Dolphins at 13th overall. Miami got a steal here, as Tunsil was projected to be drafted by the Ravens with the 6th pick.

Whether a draft is successful, or not, is most often decided by whether one’s first round is a star, or a bust.  What separates the good from the great are the athletes selected on the second and third day of the draft.  

 The Dolphins landed Laremy Tunsil, and I would give his selection alone an A+ grade. As for the Dolphins complete draft haul? A disappointing C. This grade  is  the result of Miami failing to add any other impact players n the later rounds. Here are my best and worst NFL drafts classes:

 

Local: Redskins: A- Continue reading

Redskins Ideal 7 Round Mock draft 2.0

 

After making the playoffs for the first time in three years, the Washington Redskins still have many holes to fill with the draft. By signing only three players in free agency, their general manager Scot Mccloughan made it clear that bringing in more youth is the Redskins’ path back to the playoffs.

Due to the recent signing of Pro-Bowl corner Josh Norman, the first two rounds of the draft are shaken up, with no defensive backs being selected.

*Note: This article presents the best case scenario draft for the Redskins. It is not a prediction of what will happen. Also, Scot Mccloughan will most likely trade down at various points during the draft, and I chose not to include any possible trade scenarios.

 

Round 1: 21st overall

Sheldon Rankins, DT, Louisville

After losing both Jason Hatcher and Terrance Knighton in free agency, the defensive trenches have become the biggest need for the Redskins. Last season Washington surrendered 4.8 yards per carry, and also were in the bottom ten teams in the league in terms of rushing yards per game. Out of Louisville, Rankins performed extremely well at the Senior Bowl due to his quickness and athleticism. Possessing an especially powerful lower half gives Rankins the ability to take on double teams. The Louisville alum also hustles consistently, which enables him to chase down ball carriers in the backfield. One negative is that Rankins is still developing as a pass rusher. The silver lining is that he still has the potential to blossom into a threat for quarterbacks. Scouts made note of Rankins’ versatility with pass rush moves during the Senior Bowl, which reinforces Rankins extremely high potential.

 

Round 2: 53rd overall

Jonathan Bullard, DE, Florida

Continue reading

Redskins’ Ideal Draft

Ideal Draft

After making the playoffs for the first time in three years, the Washington Redskins still have many holes to fill with the draft. By signing only two players in free agency, thier general manager Scot Mccloughan made it clear that bringing in more youth is the Redskins’ path back to the playoffs.

*Note: This article presents the best case scenario draft for the Redskins. It is not a prediction of what will happen. Also, Scot Mccloughan will most likely trade down at various points during the draft, and I chose not to include any possible trade scenarios.

 

Round 1: 21st overall

Sheldon Rankins, DT, Louisville

After losing both Jason Hatcher and Terrance Knighton in free agency, the defensive trenches have become the biggest need for the Redskins. Last season Washington surrendered 4.8 yards per carry, and also were in the bottom ten teams in the league in terms of rushing yards per game. Out of Louisville, Rankins performed extremely well at the Senior Bowl due to his quickness and athleticism. Possessing an especially powerful lower half gives Rankins the ability to take on double teams. The Louisville alum also hustles consistently, which enables him to chase down ball carriers in the backfield. One negative is that Rankins is still developing as a pass rusher. The silver lining is that he still has the potential to blossom into a threat for quarterbacks. Scouts made note of Rankins’ versatility with pass rush moves during the Senior Bowl, which reinforces Rankins extremely high potential.

 

Round 2: 53rd overall

Kendall Fuller, CB, Virginia Tech

With uncertainty surrounding Chris Culliver’s ability to bounce back from his horrendous 2015 season, an early selection at corner would be a welcome move for the Redskins. With a resumé boasting numerous accolades, this junior out of Virginia Tech would be an extremely valuable acquisition the second round. Fuller excels with the intangibles that often translate well to the NFL. For example, Fuller plays with a high IQ, is physically tough, and also has been regarded as one of college football’s most coachable players.  While on the field, his success continues. Agile and athletic, Fuller also comes down with interceptions due to his impeccable ball skills. One area in which he struggles is his press coverage, but even if the former Tech student does get beat, he is quick to recover. Since he plays aggressively, he occasionally gets flagged for pass interference.  Furthermore, Fuller is confident playing man to man, and is also a natural playmaker so he should not struggle with his transition to the pressures of the NFL. Pairing Fuller alongside Bashaud Breeland in the following years would be one step in transforming Washington’s defense into an elite defensive unit.

Round 3: 84th overall

Deandre Houston-Carson, FS, William and Mary Continue reading

Keys to the Offseason of the Redskins

For the first time in three years, the Redskins made the playoffs. Quarterback Kirk Cousins led the team to a 9-7 record as well as a division title in the NFC East. Even with the playoff appearence, Washington has many holes to fix in the offseason.

Safety

It is challenging to remember the last time the Redskins had a consistent pair of safeties, and 2015 was no different. Washington brought in veteran Dashon Goldson, along with former Seahawk Jeron Johnson to compete with Duke Ihenacho. After winning the starting job, Ihenacho suffered a season ending injury. But instead of Johnson, rookie Trenton Robinson took the starting job, implying the former free agent’s third string role in the depth charts. As a whole, the Redskins’ secondary finished in the bottom half of the league in virtually every defensive passing statistic. Out of 87 qualified safeties, Kyshoen Jarrett finished highest for Washington at 54, according to Pro Football Focus.  With both of their starting safeties over 30 years old, Scot Mccloughan will be forced to address those issues in the offseason.

Lacking depth at safety, the 2016 draft might not provide an immediate solution to Washington’s woes. When I look at the current safeties available in the draft, two jump out to me. Out of Maryland, Sean Davis has shown encouraging qualities in the past few years. Talented in run support, and also good in coverage versus tight ends, the Maryland alum is projected to be a third round pick. Though he played in the FCS division of college, Deandre Houston-Carson is still a projected fourth round pick. Houston-Carson is a former cornerback, and excels in pass coverage and special teams. Scot Mccloughan tends to draft bigger defensive backs, and both Davis and Carson are over 6’0.  

Middle Linebacker Continue reading

Redskins’ Keys to the Playoffs

The Redskins finished the 2015 season on an extremely high note. After a 3-5 start, Kirk Cousins led the Redskins to a 6-2 finish. A dominating performance against the Eagles secured the first playoff appearance for Washington in three years. Though the team will facing a lower seed in the playoffs, the Packers have a strong 10-6 record. It will be a tough matchup for Washington but here are three keys to success. (Shout out to DJ Khaled)

  1. Young Middle Linebackers Need to Step Up

Keenan Robinson, the original starter, has started once since week nine due to injury. Continue reading

The Goods and Bads Minus The Uglies

Good:

Jay Gruden’s Play calling

With five minutes remaining in the fourth quarter, the Redskins took the field down 20-16. Last week Gruden struggled with play calling, leading many analysts to criticize him and call for his job. But on the final drive of Sunday’s game the second year coach showed great improvement. Though time was a constraint Gruden mixed up the play calling, forcing the Eagles to stop playing a very conservative defensive set. Though Alfred Morris was averaging just 1.8 yards per carry going into the last drive, Coach Gruden still correctly remained confident in the bellcow back, and showed it by giving Morris four carries in the game winning drive. The trust paid off, with Morris averaging over nine yards per carry, giving Cousins pivotal room to throw. A full commitment to the passing game would have put too much pressure on Cousins, so Gruden’s change of style looks promising for the rest of the Redskins season. Continue reading